The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

Description

Product Description

Updated with must-have new recipes, diet tips, and research. Discover the simple secret to permanent weight loss and optimal health, as seen on Dr. Oz.
 

Fad diets come and go, but after more than two decades of success stories and media attention, The F-Factor Diet has stood the test of time. Now hailed as the go-to lifestyle program for anyone who wants to improve their health and lose weight for good, F-Factor’s scientifically proven approach allows you to achieve results without hunger, deprivation, or denial. Change your life without disrupting your lifestyle: dine out, drink alcohol, eat carbs, and work out less from Day 1.
 
Now revised and updated with new recipes, diet tips, and research, The F-Factor Diet includes:

· An easy to follow 3-step program to shed pounds, boost energy, and increase longevity, on which men lose an average of 15 lbs., and women 10 lbs., in just one month.
· More than 75 quick and delicious F-Factor approved recipes plus a complete set of guidelines for dining out and ordering in.
· Proven tips, tools, and solutions to keep you motivated, inspired, and on track.
 
It’s time to change your life forever and join the F-Factor movement. Your journey to a happier, healthier you begins now!

Review

“As a professional gourmand and glutton, I’ve tried every crackpot diet there is to try under the sun. Tanya Zuckerbrot’s F-Factor program is the best one I’ve found for those of us who enjoy the pleasures of a fine meal and also the occasional fine drink too.”
—Adam Platt, chief restaurant critic, New York Magazine

About the Author

Tanya Zuckerbrot, MS, RD, is a dietitian in private practice, based in New York City. She has appeared on Today, The Early Show, the Rachael Ray Show, Fox Business, MSNBC , ABC News, and on many other national media platforms. In addition, Tanya has been in profiled in The New York Times, The New York Post, the Daily Mail, and featured in Town & Country, Elle, Vogue, Allure, Self, The Washington Post, and Men’s Fitness. Visit www.FFactor.com.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter

1

How Did We Get So Fat? And Why the F-Factor Diet Is a Long-Term Solution

Thou shouldst eat to live; not live to eat.

-socrates (469 b.c.-399 b.c.)

You notice it at the beach.

    You observe it in the fans at sporting events.

    A quick look around the mall and there is no denying it: Americans are fatter than ever.

    Currently, 70 percent of American adults are overweight, and half of them are obese. Yet merely three decades ago, less than 50 percent of the American population was overweight. As the years passed, somehow our waistlines kept expanding. It wouldn''t be such a big deal if the problem were simply aesthetic. But excess weight correlates with increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, infertility, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis, and many forms of cancer. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported in 2004 that being overweight could soon overtake tobacco as the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. We clearly have reason to worry.

    A recent survey published in the National Institute of Public Health publication reports that, in the United States on any given day, 44 percent of men and almost 66 percent of women are trying to lose weight. Last year alone, Americans spent billions of dollars on weight-loss products, health club memberships, diet foods, liposuctions, and gastric bypass operations. And where did investments in these supposed panaceas get us? Despite our attempts to lose weight, this country''s population is currently the heaviest it has ever been. Our individual weight problems have become a national crisis.

    After low-fat diets failed to put an end to the epidemic of obesity, low-carb diets appeared to be the solution to Americans'' struggle with weight. We tried diets like Atkins and South Beach, and in doing so, cut out bread, fruit, milk, yogurt, and even vegetables in order to whittle down our waistlines. But after a decade of low-carb eating, the truth remains: Americans are fatter than ever.

    The problem with low-carb diets is the same as with low-fat diets, and with the numerous other failed diets of the past: their focus is on eliminating foods in order to lose weight. Whether you are cutting out fat or carbohydrates, the result is that you end up craving the foods that have become taboo. Who wants to feel deprived of their favorite foods in order to maintain a desired weight? A life without bagels for breakfast, pasta at Italian restaurants, or rice with your Chinese food? That''s crazy! And that is also why most diets are temporary.

How Did We Get So Fat?

The advent and growth of industrialization, jumbo portion sizes, and fad diets produced a predictable, understandable, and inevitable consequence-an epidemic of obesity and diet-related diseases.

Industrialization

You might equate industrialization with advancements in engineering, economy, and human resources. While sounding promising, industrialization applied to food processing has negatively affected Americans'' nutrition.

    Before industrialization, whole grains were left whole. Breads and rice were brown; fruits and vegetables were eaten just the way they came out of the ground or off the tree. These foods were nutritious, rich in vitamins, and full of fiber. Now, however, our supermarkets stock white bread, sweetened fruit drinks, and instant mashed potatoes-the legacy of agricultural industrialization that has left us in a fiber deficit.

    The absence of fiber in Americans'' diets is a major risk factor for weight gain. Despite the American Dietetic Association recommending that Americans eat 25 to 38 grams of fiber per day, the average American currently eats only 15 grams of fiber a day. Not eating enough fiber leads people to feel hungry and to overeat throughout the day.

    Snacking contributes to one-fourth of Americans'' daily caloric intake. And when we snack, what do we choose? Chips, cookies, crackers, sweetened beverages, and frozen desserts, all of which contain virtually no fiber. People who eat these foods to try to satisfy their appetites only find themselves hungry again soon after. Diets based on such refined foods create a vicious cycle of eating and hunger all day long.

    To add insult to injury, refined foods are available everywhere, all of the time. Walk down the cookie or snack-chip aisles in your supermarket, and you find hundreds of choices. Delis, food courts, and vending machines present the opportunity to snack around the clock. Gas stations used to sell only gas-now they have been remodeled to house a food market inside. Going to the gas station no longer means just filling up your tank; it now is an opportunity to fill up your belly. An increase in convenience has provoked a shift to frequent "grazing"-eating small but cumulatively hefty snacks, as opposed to regular meals.

    As technological advances have made food ever more varied, convenient, and tasty, the feeble willpower of the American public has been unable to cope. Most people know the rule of thermodynamics: calories in versus calories out. If you eat more calories than you burn, you will gain weight. Americans are not only eating more (the average American consumes 2,640 calories a day, up from 1,970 calories in 1978), we are also moving less.

    Technology has not only made food more varied and convenient, it has almost completely removed natural physical exercise from most Americans'' day-to-day lives. In the early nineteenth century, if you wanted ice cream, you would have to walk out to the pasture, milk the cow, carry the milk back to the farmhouse, mix in sugar and eggs, add salt to the ice, and churn the whole thing for hours until it froze. A person would burn a few hundred calories in the process. Now if people crave ice cream, they only have to walk to the refrigerator or drive to the nearest convenience store for a pint of Ben & Jerry''s.

    Cars, washing machines, elevators, escalators, and moving sidewalks at the airport have reduced physical exertion. Watching television for hours, sitting in front of a computer, and playing video games create the perfect recipe for weight gain.

    Eating refined foods frequently and moving less are not the only problems. Ever-expanding food portions are also to blame.

Out-of-Control Portion Sizes

Advances in agriculture and farming followed industrialization. Never has food in this country been so abundant. This country produces 3,800 calories of food for every man, woman, and child every day-almost twice as many as most people need. The surplus of food translates into whopping portions at low prices, and Americans are eating them up. Larger portions seem to make consumers feel that they are getting their money''s worth. And the food companies are responding.

    With the exception of sliced white bread, the sizes of sodas, hamburgers, French fries, pizza slices, and other foods commonly available for immediate consumption exceed standard portions determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Cookies, cooked pastas, muffins, steaks, and bagels exceeded USDA standards by 700 percent, 480 percent, 333 percent, 224 percent, and 195 percent respectively.

    In the 1950s, McDonald''s offered one size, a 2-ounce portion of French fries that contained 200 calories. Starting in 2004, the 2-ounce size was offered only on the kids'' menu, and adults were offered a 7-ounce French fry serving with 610 calories. In 1997, Starbucks took the 8-ounce Short, its smallest size, off the menu when it introduced the 20-ounce Venti (the Extra Large). Now the 12-ounce Tall is the smallest choice. Larger portions are attractive to customers because the relative prices discourage the choice of smaller portions. How many times at the concession stand at the movies have you heard the vendor tell you that for a few cents more, you can get the next size up? Unfortunately, you are not just getting more value for your money; you are also getting more calories. A Coke and buttered popcorn combination has 688 calories, while a value pack (large Coke and buttered popcorn) has 2,174 calories (based on small popcorn serving size 5 cups; large popcorn serving size 20 cups; small Coke serving size 18 oz, large Coke serving size 44 oz).

    Bigger portions are everywhere. At fast-food joints and convenience stores, the trend is hard to miss-7-Eleven offers the 48-ounce Double Gulp, and the muffins at Au Bon Pain are the size of softballs. Not only have food portions increased but, according to the National Restaurant Association in Washington, D.C., our plates have grown, too. The 10-inch plate was once the industry standard; now 12-inch plates are the norm. Servings are so big that in some restaurants you get two or three times more than you need. A typical meal at an ordinary restaurant contains 1,200 calories, and that''s without the dessert or appetizer.

    More calories equal more weight gain, pure and simple.

    Larger restaurant portions have become an increased problem because Americans eat out more frequently than they used to. Twenty years ago, most people ate in restaurants only on special occasions. Today, the typical American eats out 4.5 times a week.

    Larger portions have even entered our homes. Serving sizes in popular cookbooks, such as The Joy of Cooking, are getting "hearty" as well. In 1960, a brownie recipe in The Joy of Cooking yielded 30 brownies. Today, in its most current edition, the brownie recipe calls for exactly the same proportions as the original, but instead of the original 30-brownie yield, the recipe now yields only 16 brownies. That means each brownie is almost twice as big, with double the amount of calories as the original.

    Even "diet" foods, including certain brands of frozen dinners, now come in larger sizes. For instance, in 1996, Stouffer''s introduced a packaged food line called Lean Cuisine Hearty Portions that weighed 50 percent more than the original, and which of course had more calories.

    The result of these larger portions is that Americans'' conception of a serving has become skewed. Standard portion sizes recommended by the American Dietetic Association have become a thing of the past. Now when we are served a standard portion, it seems measly.

Fad Diets

The greater the prevalence of obesity, the more alluring is the latest fad diet promising fast and easy weight loss. American dieters'' eagerness to find the magic weight-loss bullet has led them from no-fat diets to high-protein diets. The problem now is that many Americans no longer know what they should be eating.

    In 1981, Americans were introduced to Dr. Atkins'' Diet Revolution (Bantam). The diet was high-protein and high-fat with minimal carbohydrates. People lost weight but found a diet without carbohydrates difficult to maintain. In the late 1980s, studies from the American Heart Association reported that dietary fat increased the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Americans took this information to heart, banished fat from their diets, and entered the fat-free decade of the 1990s. The 1990s introduced Americans to fat-free cookies, cakes, chips, and every food imaginable that could be remade without fat.

    Americans loved the concept of fat-free foods because, unlike other diets that made you count calories, eating fat-free meant no calorie watching. If a food was fat-free, that was the green light to dig in! Americans began eating large bagels (no cream cheese), bowls of pasta (no cream or oil, just tomato sauce) and large quantities of fat-free pastries from companies like SnackWell''s and Entenmann''s.

    For breakfast, instead of two eggs and a piece of buttered toast (265 calories, 15 grams fat), a fat-free dieter opted for a 1,000-calorie fat-free muffin. And for a snack, instead of eating two 100-calorie Oreo cookies with 5 grams of fat, people would eat half a box of SnackWell''s cookies, which contained 400 calories, and no fat. Although they were eating more calories, people assumed that, since there was no fat, they could get away with it. Wow, were they fooled!

    Unfortunately, fat-free dieting led to more weight gain. By 1990, Americans were 6 percent heavier than a decade earlier. Calories appeared to be a major culprit. Despite the drop in fat intake, average calorie intake increased from 1,970 calories a day in 1978 to 2,200 in 1990.

    Most fat-free product manufacturers replaced the fat in the recipes with sugar and starch. Many fat-free foods ended up with the same number of or even more calories than the full-fat original. And the biggest problem with eating fat-free foods is that a person never actually feels full or satisfied. That is because fat adds satiety to a meal. Without a little fat, you feel hungry soon after you finish eating. So people ate more, and eventually gained more weight. Once again, weight-conscious Americans were let down by another diet trend.

    Trends come full circle. In response to the failure of fat-free diets, we returned to the high-fat, high-protein diets of the 1970s. The Atkins diet made a comeback, and low-carb foods quickly replaced all those now-condemned low-fat products on the supermarket shelves. We threw out the offending SnackWell''s and replaced them with Atkins bars and Carb Smart ice cream. The late 1990s were spent eating steak, butter, bacon, and eggs. As long as there were no carbohydrates in a food, it was okay to eat it. Nevertheless, by the end of the ''90s, despite cutting out carbohydrates, 64.5 percent of Americans were overweight, up from 44.8 percent in 1960.

    The essential problem with diets is that people don''t stay on them very long. The average weight-loss attempt is four weeks for women, six for men. So until you pick a way of eating that''s going to last all your life, you haven''t found the "right" diet.

    How many of you have gone on a very low calorie diet for, say, two weeks and lost 5 to 10 pounds? Whether you chose the Scarsdale diet, the grapefruit diet, the cabbage soup diet, Slimfast, or Atkins, eventually you were bound to be disappointed. That''s because diets are a temporary solution to a lifelong problem.

    When people reach their weight loss goal, many go off their diet. The first thing they end up eating are the foods they felt most deprived of. If they were on Atkins, they might go for a bowl of pasta or a bagel with cream cheese. If they were on a low-fat diet, they dive into high-fat items like steak and French fries.

    Returning to our old eating habits invites the weight to come back. Once the weight returns, you find yourself on a diet again a few weeks later. It is a vicious cycle:

The Ultimate Solution: Why the F-Factor Diet Is Different

The good news is that we finally have a permanent solution.

    The F-Factor Diet is the last diet you will ever need. Now for the first time when you begin a diet, you won''t be focusing on which foods you must omit. Instead you will consider the foods you need to add to your diet in order to lose weight and keep it off. And those foods are probably just the ones you''ve been so carefully avoiding these past few years-carbohydrates.

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3.9 out of 53.9 out of 5
806 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

KJ
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New edition is Dated information -- not well adapted for non-meat protein substitutes.
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2018
I purchased the 2018 update to the 2006 edition. Essence of approach is high fiber and high protein. However, except for a new foreword -- the book appears to have dated 2006 content and doesn''t incorporate the significant nutritional findings which have occurred over the... See more
I purchased the 2018 update to the 2006 edition. Essence of approach is high fiber and high protein. However, except for a new foreword -- the book appears to have dated 2006 content and doesn''t incorporate the significant nutritional findings which have occurred over the past decade. For example -- guidance still references the dated view that eggs impact cholesterol which is no longer an accurate view. Nor does the book incorporate findings on gut microbiology. Very much a shame as several of these further support the importance of high fiber diet. If you follow a minimal or non-meat approach -- this book won''t give you much guidance and support. 90+% of protein suggestions or recipes are based on animal protein. Lastly, a quibble -- I wish the author utilized a more precise approach on serving sizes. The bulk of the food lists use volume measurements (cups) and don''t include a weight measurement (grams or ounces). For measuring foods, like fruit or vegetables --- you can significantly impact the actual food amounts by measuring a cup of small diced versus large chopped or sliced food. While I recognize that not everyone has a kitchen scale ---seems silly not to have included both as part of the point is increasing recognition for what a true ''serving size'' is.
153 people found this helpful
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mitch
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Constant Diarrhea from FFactor Products. Possibly contributed to Appendicitis
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2020
I read the book and was following step 1 (which was hard for me to stick to for more than a few days at a time). I would have a 20/20 shake in the morning, some type of protein with veggies for lunch, GG cracker pizzas/ffactor 20/20 bar/or ffactor baked cheesy bread with... See more
I read the book and was following step 1 (which was hard for me to stick to for more than a few days at a time). I would have a 20/20 shake in the morning, some type of protein with veggies for lunch, GG cracker pizzas/ffactor 20/20 bar/or ffactor baked cheesy bread with the powder for afternoon snack and then lean protein and veggies for dinner. i never felt satiated as the book says you will by eating this much fiber. I was having constant diarrhea. The book suggests working it in slowly. So then i cut everything else out but was having a shake every morning for a few weeks while also eating technically on step 2 for about a month. Still with diarrhea daily, i just figured this is how it is when you eat more fiber, you never have solid stools anymore? No negative reviews anywhere and anytime i would message with any ffactor followers they just said i had to "adjust" and "drink more water". The first month of quarantine I made my husband do ffactor with me. He would still eat normal crackers as snacks but would eat a shake and whatever i made for dinner which usually contained ffactor 20/20 vodka sauce because i was on a kick with it for the beginning of COVID. We both had stomach issues, once i was doubled over in pain and couldnt move, i thought i had appendicitis, but i took some pepto and gasx and 90 min later the pain subsided. April 18th, my husband had really bad pains and took the same meds and was waking up all night in pain and still had pain in the morning. after a telemed apt they said to go to ER and after a physical exam and CT they confirmed appendicitis and operated immediately. That was after a full month of eating FFactor products at least 1x a day for him. Seems ironic to be a coincidence. I also have developed a restricting/binging eating disorder since this diet is NOT SUSTAINABLE despite it''s claims. I feel awful that i bought into this lifestyle so fully and kept thinking it was my fault and i was doing something wrong that eating 1000 calories a day made me irritable, moody, and fatigued. If you feel this way, you ARE NOT ALONE. If you are seeking this diet out because you think it''s reputable since it''s developed by an RD, save your time and money and invest in going to an actual RD that can help you. Because that''s what you''ll be doing after this diet.
45 people found this helpful
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victoria
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fiber is good, but skip this diet.
Reviewed in the United States on August 27, 2020
The premise of the book, having a high fiber diet, is great and healthy and is helpful for all people. However, after two and a half years of following the f factor diet (strictly how the book lays out) I realize how it has made me completely afraid of eating healthy carbs... See more
The premise of the book, having a high fiber diet, is great and healthy and is helpful for all people. However, after two and a half years of following the f factor diet (strictly how the book lays out) I realize how it has made me completely afraid of eating healthy carbs like bananas, apples, sweet potatoes and whole grains which has stuck with me even after stopping to follow it strictly.

I would not leave the house without gg crackers, bringing them with me when out to eat at a restaurant and freak out if I forgot them. Looking back that is scary obsessive behavior that I learned through this book. Also not a cute look and I cringe seeing people doing this now.

The portion size of protein is also incredibly small, especially if you enjoy working out and are looking to gain muscle.

The brand also pushes their powders and bars on the diet’s consumers HARD which no one should rely on processed foods to get fiber.

I suggest if you do try F Factor out, skip their processed products and any other processed foods to get you to the recommended grams of fiber each day. Don’t be hard on yourself when eating more lean protein than their recommended amount or any fruit. And don’t follow their social media accounts because they push their powders nonstop. Not a good look for a health company and I preferred the brand before they launched the products.
44 people found this helpful
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Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
F factor book
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2019
I have the original book. It’s a difficult depressing way to eat. The crackers taste horrible and may upset your digestion with so much fiber. The powders Tanya now manufactures are SUPER EXPENSIVE and are earning her MILLIONS. There’s no real enjoyment of food ever again.... See more
I have the original book. It’s a difficult depressing way to eat. The crackers taste horrible and may upset your digestion with so much fiber. The powders Tanya now manufactures are SUPER EXPENSIVE and are earning her MILLIONS. There’s no real enjoyment of food ever again. I think Weight Watchers is the only classic practical diet to follow since it includes limited amounts from EVERY food group for diet, and for LIFE.
51 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I found this book at the library and its philosophy is so simple it never feels like dieting. As others have posted increasing fiber is ...
Reviewed in the United States on January 26, 2018
I''ve tried other types of healthy eating, but they seemed to fall short of helping me achieve my goals. I found this book at the library and its philosophy is so simple it never feels like dieting. As others have posted increasing fiber is the key. Using My Fitness Pal to... See more
I''ve tried other types of healthy eating, but they seemed to fall short of helping me achieve my goals. I found this book at the library and its philosophy is so simple it never feels like dieting. As others have posted increasing fiber is the key. Using My Fitness Pal to track what I''m eating also helps. It helped me to see that even if I thought I was eating healthy, a lot of what I was eating was heavy on the calories.
63 people found this helpful
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A Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The only diet that''s positively effected my energy level and excess estrogen
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2018
This high fiber way of eating (plus taking J.CROW''S Lugol''s Solution of Iodine 5 Percent) is the ONLY thing that''s positively effected my estrogen dominance and low energy issues. I''ve had to be very strict and completely eliminate sugar (stevia is a great substitute). But... See more
This high fiber way of eating (plus taking J.CROW''S Lugol''s Solution of Iodine 5 Percent) is the ONLY thing that''s positively effected my estrogen dominance and low energy issues. I''ve had to be very strict and completely eliminate sugar (stevia is a great substitute). But my energy is fantastic, I finally sleep well at night, and my tummy is very flat. I turned to this diet less for the flat tummy and more for managing my estrogen dominance, but I''m happy:) A typical breakfast is 1/2 cup Smart Bran cereal, 1/2 cup low-fat organic kefir, 1/2 cup organic raspberries; snack is 4 GG crackers with chocolate PB2. Easy to follow, fantastic results.
37 people found this helpful
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KATHLEEN RICHARDSON
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Save ur $$
Reviewed in the United States on April 26, 2018
Pretty much a book that pushes the companies food products that are obsolete
and for an “updated book” most of the info is the same
Would love to have my $15 back
66 people found this helpful
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Lauren Rabadi
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Low Calorie, Low Net Carb, Low Fat, Low Protein Diet
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2020
Low Calorie, Low Net Carb, Low Fat, Low Protein Diet
23 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

zorica
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cleaning up your life.
Reviewed in Canada on August 18, 2018
Very informative book and intresting reading on importance of the need of fiber for smooth running and healthy body. Zorica
Very informative book and intresting reading on importance of the need of fiber for smooth running and healthy body.
Zorica
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Barbara Gans
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not the exact product shown when purchased!
Reviewed in Canada on August 2, 2019
I thought it was the newer edition, that’s what was advertised! And that is what the picture was .. the newer edition , which by the way has been updated and is different!
I thought it was the newer edition, that’s what was advertised! And that is what the picture was .. the newer edition , which by the way has been updated and is different!
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Soleil
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Me lo recomendaron...
Reviewed in Mexico on June 29, 2019
Me hubiera gustado que trajera mas ejemplos de menús. Me lo recomendó una amiga.
Me hubiera gustado que trajera mas ejemplos de menús. Me lo recomendó una amiga.
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Barbara LaForme
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in Canada on March 28, 2018
Love this book, many recipes and easy to follow.
Love this book, many recipes and easy to follow.
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marima01
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great information
Reviewed in Canada on December 20, 2018
Diet help
Diet help
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The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale

The F-Factor Diet: Discover outlet online sale the Secret to Permanent Weight 2021 Loss online sale